Moderator

monocoque semi monocoque

[8] After failed attempts with several large flying boats in which a few components were monocoques, he built the Zeppelin-Lindau V1 to test out a monocoque fuselage. [21] The bike had other innovative features, including an engine with oval shaped cylinders, and eventually succumbed to the problems associated with attempting to develop too many new technologies at once. The wings of modern passenger jets are also a monocoque construction. Monocoque , also called structural skin, is a structural system in which loads are supported by an object's external skin, similar to an egg shell. Few metal aircraft can strictly be regarded as pure monocoques, as they use a metal shell or sheeting reinforced with frames riveted to the skin, but most wooden aircraft are described as monocoques, even though they also incorporate frames. This reduces weight for a given amount of armour. French industrialist and engineer Georges Roy attempted in the 1920s to improve on the bicycle-inspired motorcycle frames of the day, which lacked rigidity. While all-metal aircraft such as the Junkers J 1 had appeared as early as 1915, these were not monocoques but added a metal skin to an underlying framework. In parallel to Dornier, Zeppelin also employed Adolf Rohrbach, who built the Zeppelin-Staaken E-4/20, which when it flew in 1920[10] became the first multi-engined monocoque airliner, before being destroyed under orders of the Inter-Allied Commission. adjective. Monocoque (/ˈmɒnəˌkɒk, -ˌkoʊk/), also called structural skin, is a structural system in which loads are supported by an object's external skin, similar to an egg shell. To make the shell, thin strips of wood were laminated into a three dimensional shape; a technique adopted from boat hull construction. This type of structure is more accurately referred to as a semi-monocoque. In the United States, Northrop was a major pioneer, introducing techniques used by his own company and Douglas with the Northrop Alpha. The monocoque increases the safety of the car, as it is less likey to break apart in the event of a crash. Moreira, Lucas F. M. da Silva, & Paulo M.S.T. [3] Other semi-monocoques, not to be confused with true monocoques, include vehicle unibodies, which tend to be composites, and inflatable shells or balloon tanks, both of which are pressure stabilised. This type of structure is more accurately referred to as a semi-monocoque. de Castro, Structural Connections for Lightweight Metallic Structures , →ISBN , page 241: ‘The aircraft is of conventional semi-monocoque design and mainly aluminium alloy construction.’. A plane is an excellent example of this type of structure. semi-monocoque (plural semi-monocoques) A modification of the monocoque design to include reinforcing members such as stringers or frames to increase strength while minimizing weight . It was described by Cycle World in 2000 as a "monocoque backbone...a single large diameter beam" and "Fabricated from a combination of castings and sheet-metal stampings".[24]. [19][20] Honda also experimented with the NR500, a monocoque Grand Prix racing motorcycle in 1979. google_color_border = "336699"; [17] Although the single-cylinder Ossa had 20 horsepower (15 kW) less than its rivals, it was 45 pounds (20 kg) lighter and its monocoque frame was much stiffer than conventional motorcycle frames, giving it superior agility on the racetrack. google_ad_client = "pub-1698037631606045";